North Carolina Culture

One of the dancers in Cherokee I interviewed for my dissertation posted this video on his Facebook page (now there’s a line Boas never wrote). In it you’ll hear some of the Cherokee language as well as tribal members discussing why their language is important to them and some of the steps they are taking to preserve their language for future generations.

That’s beautiful land, the mountains. I’d go back there in a heartbeat, if I could.

If you were listening carefully you probably noticed the unique way that Cherokees speak the English language. It shares a lot in common with the Appalachian dialect. While I’m missing the mountains I might as well share one more video.

The Appalachian dialect and the Southern way of talking more generally are both closely related to Scottish English and trace their origins back to the particular way North American was colonized.

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About Matt Thompson

Matt Thompson is a project cataloger at The Mariners' Museum library. He has a Ph.D. in anthropology from the University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill and was formerly a professor at ODU. You can find him on Twitter @m4ttTh0mps0n.
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